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391: archive391 issues - dada manifestos - dada audio - and the rest

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391-47: Karawane
391-47: Karawane

Editor: babel
01/06/2016

Infinite dadaist phonetic poetry: multiple authors read Hugo Ball's Karawane. Add your own line to join the chorus.

391-46: DaliKrab
391-46: DaliKrab

Editor: Justynn Tyme
09/03/2013 (last update: 08/05/2016)

DaliKrab Day is a fringe holiday. It's about enjoying who you are and what you do. It's about having fun and creating something on pure impulse. It's at least 28 hours long. Hell, it can one day long or 366 days long. It's not about pride, it's about Legos dipped in chocolate. It's about standing on top of an open umbrella in a downpour. It's about immersing yourself in yourself. Post your submissions to dalikrabday@gmail.com

391-45: The 4th Search
391-45: The 4th Search

Editor: Sebastian Elk
26/04/2012

Moderari et tueri omnia: Questions for the 4th Replacement Search.

391-44: dada.tv
391-44: dada.tv

Editors: Justynn Tyme, babel
01/01/2011 (last update: 7/07/2015)

Turn on, tune in, dada out.

Like every great religion of the past we seek to find the divinity within and to express this revelation in a life of glorification and the worship of dada. These ancient goals we define in the metaphor of the present - turn on, tune in, dada out.

391-43: BLAST-UP!
391-43: BLAST-UP!

Editors: Katy Smith/babel
Contributors: Wyndham Lewis
30/11/2009 (last update: 29/01/2015, version 1.2), Cambridge, UK

BLAST-UP! is a computer game, a poem and a tribute to Vorticism, the English response to continental avant-garde provocations in the years just before the First World War.

Conceived by Katy Price and programmed by babel, BLAST-UP! is loaded with vocabulary drawn from sources in British mass culture such as Heat Magazine and the Daily Mirror.

The player of BLAST-UP! fires at these invading words as they swarm across the screen, accumulating a list of 'Blessed' and 'Blasted' terms.

At game over, BLAST-UP! prints a manifesto in the style of the short-lived Vorticist publication, Blast, produced by Ezra Pound and Wyndham Lewis from 1912-1914.

BLAST-UP! has been created to bring the spirit and ideas of Vorticism into contact with a wider audience. It also aims to extend the capacities of digital poetry, by exploring the extent of reader / user involvement in creating output and supplying input names and terms.

BLAST-UP! needs your text suggestions: please post them here as comments.

391-42: Reconstructing Mayakovsky
391-42: Reconstructing Mayakovsky

Editor: Illya Szilak
Contributors: Pelin Kirca
01/03/2009, New York, USA

Set in the future, the novel revisits the past to make sense of the chaotic present. Inspired by Vladimir Mayakovsky, the Russian Futurist poet who killed himself in 1930 at the age of thirty-six, the novel imagines a world where uncertainty and tragedy have finally been eliminated through technology. Like the novel, the site uses appropriated objects (image, sound, text) and combines elements of historical fiction, science fiction, poetry, and the detective novel, to tell the story of Mayakovsky in a radically different way.

391-41: 45 letters to Magnussons before the spring...
391-41: 45 letters to Magnussons before the spring...

Editor: Annabel Castro
13/04/2007, Mexico City, Mexico

This net.art project is a search for the physicality behind data, in an allegory on the behavior of spam. It questions whether only advertisements have the right to track our data and contact us in second person using the facts they unearth about us?

I explore digital geography, in the analog world. I write to people whose data I find in the virtual stream at the physical and real spaces where they are. I take pictures of the handwritten signs in my letters, signs that speak about me, and I send them in physical form to persons that enter into contact with this "intromission" as they rip open the envelope. I write to a remote name about what I hope we both have: existence.

*45 letters to Manussons* on line returns the data to where it came from, but with new layers. All the jpeg and html files that document the letters are named for the persons I send them to. This means that the files can appear as links when looking up the person's name on a search engine. The web page is a public document of the private epistolary event between each Magnusson and me.

391-40.4: WP
391-40.4: WP

Editors: The 404
Contributors: crescent, Justynn Tyme, Binnorie, babel
01/01/2007, New York, USA

The 404 wordpressed... (at least) a post per day for (at least) 404 days.

391-40: Universal Wish
391-40: universal wish

Editors: Magda Bielesz (concept, images) and babel (coding, images)
Contributors: Jeffrey F. Hill (original guestbook scripting)
01/08/2006 (last update: 10/01/2010), Warsaw, Poland

Make a wish... the best wishes will be turned into images. In English and Polish.

391-39: Vertovia
391-39: Vertovia

Editor: babel
Contributors: Dziga Vertov; the ghost of artE.
31/07/2006, Montreal, Canada

Remix of Vertov's 1929 film 'Man With A Movie Camera'. Welcome to the land of Vertovia, where a person cannot tell whether he or she is being observed, and so will behave at all times as if they are. In English and Russian.

391-38: Urbanalities
391-38: Urbanalities

Editors: babel vs Escha
23/01/2006, Montreal, Canada

An urban short story-poem-animated comic-musical collaboration. The text is generated randomly as you watch, so you will never see exactly the same story twice.

more information

391-37: Zinhar
391-37: Zinhar

Editor: babel
Contributors: Serkan Işin, Derya Vural, Deniz Tuncel, Baris Cetinkol, Asli Serin, Abraham Abulafia, Keith Martin, Escha
05/05/2005 (last update: 23/10/2005), Istanbul, Turkey

"Imagine a day when any living thing can be identified accurately and rapidly to the species level using a hand-held device the size of a cellular phone. A day when the biodiversity of an entire nation can be inventoried and monitored... thanks to an ambitious effort by a growing consortium of scientists, it is poised to become reality. The method that will enable this advance is 'DNA barcoding', an approach that employs a small fragment of DNA, a portion of a single gene, to provide a unique identifier - a 'DNA barcode' - for each living species on Earth." - Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding ('Barcode of Life' project)

One of the most important components of the 'Barcode of Life' initiative is the construction of a public reference library of species identifiers which could be used to assign unknown specimens to known species. This database will lead to the 'Life Barcoder', linking biological identification to developments in DNA sequencing, electronics and information science.

In order to construct the database, DNA barcode data must first be obtained from all known species. Perhaps it is no surprise then that barcodes - designed to tag physical objects with information in order to be processed by computers - are now being extended to humans in the form of 'bio-barcodes' that can be implanted or injected. Despite the ethical concerns about this surreptitious physical integration of the digital into the biological, a number of companies are rushing to patent human bar code systems in a market already estimated to be worth $100 billion.

Both these developments are at the root of Zinhar - a representation of a future handheld bioscanner that is broken and incomplete, but can be fixed by the user in order to complete its scan for life.

391-37: Zinhar is a collaboration between Zinhar and 391.org in Turkish and English.

391-36: singaporeasy
391-36: singaporeasy

Editor: Liz Swift
11/11/2004, Cheltenham, UK

Singaporeasy is a hypertext story based on an experience of a stopover in a strange city. It is a cross between a travel guide and a jumble of trivial memories and fleeting ideas. It contains narratives, which overlap and inform one another but never conclude. It invites the reader to click on the links, to choose their own path, to wander.

Singaporeasy is part of ongoing research by Void:Projects into ways of using hypertext to create digital scripts for use with live theatre work. For more information on this and future projects contact Liz Swift.

391-35: krabatof
391-35: Krabatof

Editor: 20000volt
04/04/2004 (last update: 2006), Switzerland

391-34: dadaventuras
391-34: Dadaventuras

Editor: babel
Contributors: Maria Colino
24/02/2004 (last update: 21/04/2004), Madrid, Spain

Dadaventuras is an experiment in aleatory narrative, using comic book conventions to generate stories from 8 distinct but overlapping perspectives.

The language of our narrative is hybrid (from the greek 'hybris', outrage or violation): composed of parts from different languages, in this case our own blend of 'spanglish'. This intentionally recalls the Dadaists use of nonsense to express dissatisfaction with a world society that continued its insane addiction to war. But don't feel limited by our nincompoopery. You can use your own text as the basis for the generated narratives, or one of 8 classic texts, or just turn the text off completely and make the story up in your head.

391-33: Die Fliegen
391-33: Die Fliegen

Editor: babel
Contributors: Hugo Ball, Evoeh, Escha, Inese Vepa
02/04/2003 (last update: 05/08/2004), Montreal, Canada

A dadaist adventure inspired by Hugo Ball's Flight out of Time.

391-32: Twentythree
391-32: Twentythree

Editor: babel
Contributors: Charlie Chaplin, Benny Goodman, Gale Henry, Max Linder, Mabel Normand, Panoptica
23/02/2003 (last update: 26/08/2011), London, UK

391 at the speakeasy. No issues of 391 were published in 1923: twentythree is a playful speculation of what Francis Picabia may have been doing in his time away.

391-31: Videodynamism
391-31: Videodynamism

Editors: artEficial / babel
Contributors: Hans Arp, Fernand Léger, Hans Richter, Kurt Schwitters
09/09/2002 (last update: 07/03/2003), Montreal, Canada

In 1913 Anton Bragaglia contrasted his notion of a futurist 'photodynamism' with the contemporary methods of cinematography and chronophotography: "We are not interested in the precise reconstruction of movement, which has already been broken up and analysed. We are involved only in the area of movement which produces sensation." Photodynamism records images in a distorted state "since images themselves are inevitably transformed in movement".

'Videodynamism' is similarly unconcerned with perfect reproduction or the moment: "our aim is to make a determined move away from reality, since cinematography, photography and chronophotography already exist to deal with mechanically precise and cold reproduction." We see the images devolve into broken idealised forms, and without user interaction, they eventually fade away completely.

The intention is to capture something more essential, to represent the motion itself, its form and volume in space across time: "We seek the interior essence of things: pure movement; and we prefer to see everything in motion". Videodynamism takes account of both the motion of the subject and the motion of the screen upon which the subject is depicted. This may represent the movement of the eye around its visual field, as well as the dynamism of screens/windows in a digital environment.

391-30: 404
391-30: 404

Editors: 404
Contributors: artEficial, babel, Binnorie, Champking, Cheeky, Lilly Von, Sarawut Chutiwongpeti, Royce Icon, Piero Manzoni, Phooty Raskel
03/09/2002 (last update: 25/02/2004), New York, USA

391-29: Access Points
391-29: Access Points

Editor: Hooshla Fox
Contributors: Jenny Asprey, babel, Beta, Ben De Lisi, Panoptica, Phage, Juli Singh, Inese Vepa
23/04/2002, South Pasadena, USA

A geographic parody of the social, political and cultural practices that function as access points in an average city.

Nowadays, production is cheap and easy. The bottleneck is not so much in recording an album or printing a book, as it is getting your album or book 'out there'. With this in mind, those who control the points of access to information and products are increasingly the most powerful and important people and corporations in the world. Clearly a television station programmer or a newspaper editor has a great deal of control over what people learn and think, but there are even more critical access points. For example, on September 11th, the phone companies limited the number of circuits available that people could use to contact people in New York so that emergency workers would have reliable communication. In that situation, the action was justified, but it demonstrates the unbelievable power of the person who flipped the switch to cut one of the world's biggest cities off from the outside world.

Access points exist in almost every area of our lives, from search engines to supermarkets. They are necessary for the organization of all the information, products, and people in the world, but as they become more concentrated and more centralized, great amounts of power and influence are concentrated and centralized with them. Every business on this map represents a point of access that is at once necessary and problematic.

  • Digital Visions, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada (6/2004)

391-28: delivered the hand of our lady, Fatima to Marie Roget
391-28: Delivered the hand of our lady, Fatima to Marie Roget

Editor: Marie Roget
09/03/2002, North Carolina, USA

391-27: Level 7
391-27: Level 7

Editor: You
22/02/2002 (last update: 01/01/2011), Cambridge, UK

391-26: Tunnel
391-26: Tunnel

Editors: Shixa, babel
Contributors: Carlo Sansolo
20/02/2002 (last update: 06/06/2006), Philadelphia, USA

An audio-visual collage featuring the work of EJ Marey, Francis Darwin, David Hamel and others to explore the concept of a tunnel.

391-25: Binary
391-25: Binary

Editor: babel
Contributors: Jane Jones, Georg Lakoç, Samantha du Raeno
01/10/2001, Riga, Latvia

"All opposite elements are like this: because of certain conditions, they are on the one hand opposed to each other and on the other hand they are interconnected, interpentrating, interpermeating and interdependent; this character is called identity." - Mao Tse-Tung

391-24: Terminology Poets
391-24: Terminology Poets

Editor: mycat8u
Contributors: Lilith
18/06/2001

391-23: Monument
391-23: Monument

Editor: mycat8u
06/06/2001, Jerusalem

Out of print

391-22: Digital Divide
391-22: Digital Divide

Editor: Lilith
Contributors: artEficial / babel
01/05/2001 (last update: 25/02/2003), Washington DC, USA

391-21: antitram
391-21: AntiTram

Editor: babel
Contributors: Shixa, Phage, Escha, Juan M. Hernandez, Cheeky, Taylor Phillips, Inese Vepa, Cynical Blues, artEficial
01/01/2001 (last update: 2015), London, UK

AntiTram was formed in the spring of 1995 to prevent an insidious Cambridge tramsprawl. It continues to say NO! to trams.

391-20: dada2mada

391-20: dada2mada - cover 391-20: dada2mada - free gift 391-20: dada2mada - page 2 391-20: dada2mada - page 3 391-20: dada2mada - page 4 391-20: dada2mada - page 5 391-20: dada2mada - back
Editor: babel
01/01/2000, Montreal, Canada

Now, the audience expects the spectacle: it is not for us to put on a show, but to show the audience that they are the spectacle.

391-19: Journal de l'Instantanéisme

391-19: Journal de l'Instantanéisme - cover
Contributors: André Breton, René Magritte, Pierre De Massot, E.L.T. Mesens
08/1924, Paris, France

391-18: Black and White

391-18: Black and White - cover
Contributors: Louis Aragon, André Breton, Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Pierre De Massot, Ezra Pound, Erik Satie, Rrose Sélavy (Marcel Duchamp), Laurence Vail
07/1924, Paris, France

391-17: Pierre de Massot

391-17: Pierre de Massot - cover
Contributors: André Breton, Robert Desnos, Man Ray, Erik Satie
06/1924, Paris, France

391-16: Superréalisme

391-16: Superréalisme - cover
Contributors: Catawi-Menasse
05/1924, Paris, France

391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou

391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - cover 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 1 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 2 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 3 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 4 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 5 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 6 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 7 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 8 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 9 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 10 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 11 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - page 12 391-15: Le Pilhaou-Thibaou - back
Contributors: Céline Arnauld, Georges Auric, Suzanne Beguin, Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, Christian, Jean Cocteau, Jean Crotti, Paul Dermee, Funny-Guy (Francis Picabia), Pierre de Massot, Clément Pansaers, Ezra Pound, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Erik Satie, Christian Schad, Rrose Sélavy (Marcel Duchamp), Walter Serner, Guillermo De Torre, Edgar Varese, Georges Verly
10/07/1921, Paris, France

391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres

391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - cover 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - page 1 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - page 2 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - page 3 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - page 4 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - page 5 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - page 6 391-14: Copie d'un autographe d'Ingres - back
Contributors: Maurice Aisen, Céline Arnauld, Hans Arp, Marguerite Buffet, Serge Charchoune, Jean Cocteau, Jean Crotti, Paul Dermee, Marcel Duchamp, Paul Eluard, Marie De La Hire, Man Ray, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Walter Serner, Tristan Tzara, Edgar Varese
11/1920, Paris, France

391-13: Ce numéro est entouré

391-13: Ce numéro est entouré
Contributors: Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Tristan Tzara
07/1920, Paris, France

391-12: Tableau Dada

391-12: Tableau Dada
Contributors: Louis Aragon, Céline Arnauld, André Breton, Marguerite Buffet, Paul Dermee, Marcel Duchamp, Paul Eluard, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Walter Serner, Phillipe Soupault, Tristan Tzara
03/1920, Paris, France

391-11: calendrier cinéma

391-11: calendrier cinéma
Contributors: Pierre Albert-Birot, André Breton, Max Jacob, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Walter Serner, Tristan Tzara
02/1920, Paris, France

391-10: La bicyclette archevêque

391-10: La bicyclette archevêque
Contributors: Guillaume Apollinaire, Hans Arp, Henri Asselin, Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, Albert Gleizes, Georges De Pawlowski, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Tristan Tzara, Clément Vautel
12/1919, Paris, France

391-09: Continent

391-09: Continent
Editor: Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes
Contributors: Tristan Tzara
11/1919, Paris, France

391-08: Construction

391-08: Construction
Contributors: Hans Arp, Alice Bailly, Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, Pharamousse (Francis Picabia), Tristan Tzara
02/1919, Zurich, Switzerland

391-07: Ballet Mécanique

391-07: Ballet Mécanique - cover 391-07: Ballet Mécanique - page 1 391-07: Ballet Mécanique - page 2 391-07: Ballet Mécanique - back
Contributors: Walter Arensberg, Paul-Emile Bibily, Henri Jean Vernot
08/1917, New York, USA

391-06: Américaine

391-06: Américaine
07/1917, New York, USA

391-05: Åne

391-05: Åne - cover 391-05: Åne - page 1 391-05: Åne - page 2 391-05: Åne - page 3 391-05: Åne - page 4 391-05: Åne - page 5 391-05: Åne - page 6 391-05: Åne - back
Contributors: Walter Arensberg, Paul Dermee, Albert Gleizes, Max Jacob, Pharamousse (Francis Picabia), Edgar Varese, Marius De Zayas
06/1917, New York, USA

391-04: Roulette

391-04: Roulette
Contributors: Guillaume Apollinaire, Max Goth (Maximilien De Gauthier), Marie Laurencin, Otho Lloyd, Pharamousse (Francis Picabia)
25/03/1917, Barcelona, Spain

391-03: Flamenca

391-03: Flamenca
Contributors: Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia, Max Goth (Maximilien de Gauthier), Pharamousse (Francis Picabia), Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes
01/03/1917, Barcelona, Spain

391-02: Peigne

391-02: Peigne - cover 391-02: Peigne - page 1 391-02: Peigne - page 2 391-02: Peigne - back
Contributors: Max Goth (Maximilien de Gauthier), Max Jacob, Otho Lloyd, Olga Sackaroff
10/02/1917, Barcelona, Spain

391-01: Novia

391-01: Novia
Contributors: Max Goth (Maximilien de Gauthier), Marie Laurencin, Pharamousse (Francis Picabia)
25/01/1917, Barcelona, Spain